Social Networking: An Educational Platform?

Social media is everywhere, and more than two-thirds of individuals aged 16 or over have at least registered on one social media platform, the most popular being Facebook and Twitter. As these platforms have permeated into the means that we use to interact with each other, they help engage us. Nevertheless, there is always a fine line between giving too much information (spamming) and giving too little of it that may fail to keep us interested.

Maths lovers can now share their solutions and discuss their ideas with their peers, lecturers or even their parents via online social media platforms. The main benefit is evident as the information is available instantly to users with access to them. The problem is: how can they be integrated into the student learning process? Some schools already incorporate them into it, hoping to harness the potential of these learning tools thoroughly. However, if not managed carefully, these initiatives can deepen the digital divide between individuals in classrooms, instead of the intended outcome.

According to many studies, lower income families spend considerably more of their time on the Internet playing games, watching videos, or connecting on social networking sites. This tendency is because educators do not teach them how to use technology in more productive ways.

Gaining one useful educational model (or many) via online social networking can help bridge the gap between regions substantially, but the answer may be different for individual nations. What is your self-approach to social media? Also, what are your thoughts on the matter of having it as an educational platform?

Written by Colina Tran

Sources:
http://www.bbcactive.com/BBCActiveIdeasandResources/Howsocialmediaischangingeducation.aspx (extracted 21st April, 2017)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_media_in_education (extracted 21st April, 2017)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563215003040
https://www.nada.kth.se/utbildning/grukth/exjobb/rapportlistor/2011/rapporter11/osaga_mburu_alibina_11027.pdf

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